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Antarctica Asylum - 22 by ForgetfulRainn Antarctica Asylum - 22 by ForgetfulRainn
"Christmas II"

Stanley evolving psychologically, but still very much his own self.

Black stands for endless night.
White stands for pristine snow.
Green stands for within the asylum.

Behold the Antarctica Asylum from the front for the very first time in the history of this cartoon!

Molly, Gwen, and Stanley are all dressed by Caran D'Ache.
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:iconcool-slayer:
cool-slayer Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
how thoughtful and sweet of stanley... to offer his most prized possession, even if it is an horrible instrument of torture :lol:
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2008
It's Love according to Stan!
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:iconkkarasu:
KKarasu Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2007
what does a kneecap-remover looks like?

...sounds dangerous.....
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2007
That's gonna be the running joke with this object: you'll never see it, but the characters will, and they'll be horrified. Muwahaha!
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:iconkkarasu:
KKarasu Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2007
it sounds horrifying.
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2007
My personal idea if what the "kneecap-remover" looks like is something like an atrocious corkscrew...
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:iconkkarasu:
KKarasu Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2007
that sure sounds.....hurfull.....
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2007
Hurtful! You better learn to spell correctly boy or I'm launching Stanley on you and he'll teach you the meaning of the word "hurtful" with the nasty help of his kneecap-remover!
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:iconnunheh:
nunheh Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2007
Gwen is apparently a believing existentialist....
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2007
It's the Jean-Paul Sartre showing through... He's one of my favourite French writers, and I'm preparing an exam on him... But nah, it's the "phenomenological ontologist" in me, not Sartre's influence.
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:iconnunheh:
nunheh Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2007
Hey! I'm a big Husserl fan! Edmund Husserl gave me the ony real basis I've ever found for understanding anything. Heidegger and Merlau-Ponty et al had some interest, but when it came down to brass tacks ontologically speaking, Husserl was the man. Not a lot of humans I know (if any at this point) are familiar with Husserl. And this is a problem for mankind. They aren't even conversant with Farmology let alone phenomenology...contour plowing and crop rotation is rarely studied
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2007
I hear of all of these more than I ever read any... But I hear Heidegger is kickass. Is Husserl something like the father of phenomenology? I think so, but I ain't sure.
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:iconnunheh:
nunheh Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2007
He's the root and beginning of phenomenology, but mostly concerned himself with with epistemology and its impact on ontology. Basically, what can I know to be true. A sort of Descartian theme. He develops a method called eidetic reduction, where you take a thought and chop away all that is presupposition in any fashion, and also what do we mean when we say it...Switzerland exists...but what is Switzerland and what do we mean by existence, and when we answer that apply the same process on our answer. Until we come across simething that we know or cannot doubt, and needs no further reduction. Heidegger, Sartre, Merlau Ponty etc. (but mostly those three) sort of represent and individual expression of where that basis takes them. Reading Husserl is very dry compared to them, but for some reason I latched onto him like a leech.
Jesus: I have come to bring Truth into the world.
Pilate: What is truth?
Nietzsche called Pilates words the 'most profound in the gospels (or bible,but I think Gospels.)
And always wanting to know what Jesus meant, I had to look into it. Pilate just gave a tired answer as if there was no such thing ultimately. I don't want to believe it.
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2007
That brings back memories of this deadly epistemology class I attended way back in 2001... I was fresh in the philo department, and that was a class for second cycle students, but our teacher recommended the class to us. We had a teacher from Paris for it, who came from France every other week, and the class lasted 4 hours. 4 hours in a class for 20 students, with 50 to 60 actual students. People were on the floor, 4 at tables meant for two, it was insane. And the teacher taught so badly... He speeded like a maniacal squirrel on crack and basically I had no idea what he was talking about for most of the time, but I remember dissecting sentences down to theit "atomic truths".

Then I read about epistemology in my philosophy atlas, and one of them said he gave up epistemology because it was ridiculous madness after a certain degree... It sure is interesting, but that more than anything else would require a good teacher.

I'm consulting my Bibles tonight! Let's check good ol' Pilate. Besides, Jesus answers to Pilate's inability to comprehend "Truth" would simply be that humans can't get it, which is why we'd need to have it revealed, or felt with our hearts.

Thanks for the explanation!
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:iconnunheh:
nunheh Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2007
One of the things I ponder is what did Jesus mean? Elsewhere he says I am the Truth. But again, than what is he? for me, the most ponderable human in history was Jesus. I've always felt incredible insight and... Truth! lurked there, like through the eye of God. And salvation was in the vision....but it is a vision that's always out of reach, often just felt, but trying to attain to it was what I should be doing. And it is not what I'm always doing.
But also knew my vision was not it.
One thought.....most of these things require not so much a good teacher but a good student. Too often good teachers lead one away from genuine understanding. We need to wrestle through them, even if somewhat blindly, by ourselves. I don't have a lot of use for academia...prefer to try to unravel the original sources themselves, than believe what people say about them.
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2007
Oh noes! Why do so many people think of the academia that way? Unraveling original sources is what any class does. In the humanities, you're literally forced to juggle with various opinions, including your own (most importantly, since you're discussing the ideas of others) and so nothing in the academia promotes single-mindedness, and quite on the contrary, it encourages (demands!) you to be extremely critical towards every source you use. It is NEVER about "believing" what anyone says. You can't study anything if you don't know the primary sources yourself, for one, and you'd never go to a class about this or that book or author without being exposed to the stuff on your, because there'll never be a teacher who'll read the material TO you or FOR you.

Good students will always learn, but not everyone is a good student, and that requires good teachers. That said, the majority of students in the academy (in my country at least) got there because they were good students already; you can't get there without having what it takes (or almost).
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(1 Reply)
:iconmommyfish:
mommyfish Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2007
That is so cute!
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2007
Thank you!
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December 26, 2007
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