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October 27, 2007
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J.D. Salinger Stamp 2 by ForgetfulRainn J.D. Salinger Stamp 2 by ForgetfulRainn
My 50th stamp!

And it's fabulous author J.D. Salinger who gets the honour.
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:iconnbbren:
Nbbren Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Catcher in The Rye is my favorite book of all time.
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012
I understand; I'd probably have to say the same. :)
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:iconmissariaaaa:
missariaaaa Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2010  Student Artist
Thanks for making this! I faved it without commenting earlier and I hate when I do that. >_< It's really good! =]

Did you hear that they found 15 manuscripts of his? They're probably going to get publish is my guess, but I will be a bit upset if they do, since they are not being published with his permission. =/
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2010
Thank you!

And no, I heard nothing! But I'm damn interested! 15 manuscripts!!! Nice!

Don't be upset, nobody writes anything if they don't want, at some point, someone to read. Salinger just didn't want them published while he was alive. If he had wanted them to remain unread forever, he would have burned them, but that's clearly not what he was going for.

I heard that he wrote 8 hours a day for 40 years. You'd not do that if you didn't want anyone to read! Besides, you can't publish anything if the author explicitly said you couldn't. His children, I guess, are the owners of his work now. I really hope those books exist! That's the only thing that could somewhat cheer me up.
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:iconmissariaaaa:
missariaaaa Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2010  Student Artist
That is very true. =]

Woah! That's crazy! 0.0 He must've really been full on dedicated to his writing.

I really respect him for staying out of the public eye and not letting the fame get to him. It really shows that he does what he does because he loves it and not for the fame like a lot of authors nowadays do.
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2010
Agreed, although I'm glad I was born in 1982, because if I had been an earlier fan, I would be dead by now and could never read his work. Imagine if you were a teen in 1951!
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:iconmissariaaaa:
missariaaaa Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2010  Student Artist
That would suck! D= I mean sure the 50's were cool (Buddy Holly, Johnny Cash, etc) but things were so much more strict, morally especially.

So yeah, it's good to be young! xD
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2010
You know, I actually think things were LESS strict than today, with all the political correctness and what not. Also, back, if you said something stupid on TV or in front of your friends, not everyone had a camera and could make the whole world see it forever on the internet... xD Maybe some day we'll start regreting the old days (especially if stolen pictures of your intimacy get on the internet! Gah!)
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:iconmissariaaaa:
missariaaaa Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2010  Student Artist
Politically, things were less strict (in the US at least). Many drugs were still legal and such. BUT things were much more hush hush. So even if you were doing bad things, they were not openly or even known about in many cases.

But those are very good points. xD Though those haven't really happened to me. Which is good. o.o
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:iconwaza-loo:
WAZA-LOO Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:heart:
This is in my journal, for as long as my current obsession lasts.
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2007
Thank you!!! A Salinger obsession is not the kind that ends! And that generally means you're a tasteful being whose spirituality is worthy of my praise; and thus, I admire you, fellow human being!

Thanks for the comment!
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:iconwaza-loo:
WAZA-LOO Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you, and I feel the same way. I don't like to judge people without knowing them, but with things like literature, you can generally tell how a person thinks by how they interpret writing. Some people see Catcher in the Rye as a "coming of age book", and I understand their viewpoint, but to me it's a moment in a boy's spiritual journey, a look into the mind of someone with "the sight" as I call it. And I think you understand what I mean! So cheers to you.
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2007
Haha, oh yeah; I can't stand it when people say it's a "coming of age" book, because if it is, it certainly isn't the coming of age of a 16 years old... and that'd be the kind of age that not every ever reaches. Lots of people seem to have been fooled by the style of the book, because of the very stupid idea that intelligent things need to be said in complicated ways. I never lose from mind that Salinger was there on D-Day and suffered through post-traumatic stress disorder, read hundreds of books about spirituality, and so much more... It's much deeper than one may think, but it takes a kindred soul to realise this. So anyone thinking the novel is a "coming of age" novel needs to... grow up.
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:iconwaza-loo:
WAZA-LOO Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
exactly.
or if they think he's just whining.
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2007
Right on! They should invent the "Salinger Test"... you read the book and if you like it, you're kickass, if you don't, you suck. When I'm a boss, that'll be the main test for hiring my employees...
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:iconvirgokitten:
virgokitten Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2007
"I am a kind of paranoiac in reverse. I suspect people of plotting to make me happy."

Oh, how I adore him!
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2007
DA again didn't warn me of this comment... I'm getting upset at the thought of how many comments I don't get told of!

Anyway, thanks a lot! Salinger is one of my most favourite authors ever, and he IS immensely talented.

:)
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:iconvirgokitten:
virgokitten Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2007
How horrid. =( It does that to me sometimes, if it's too soon. Bloody dA bugs!

I love him. I haven't read everything by him, but I will one day!
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2007
There are only 4 books out there for now, in reading order:

- The Catcher in the Rye
- Nine Stories (Or "For Esthme, with Love & Squalor" in the Penguin edition)
- Franny & Zooey
- Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenters & Seymour: An Introduction

The last three are connected, they're about the Glass family, mostly. I recommend to buy them in the Penguin edition because the Little Brown one is... crappy. Bad paper, bad printing, bad size, etc. Whereas the Penguin are just great and all four have the same design, with a different colour for each, which is just sweet. :)
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:iconvirgokitten:
virgokitten Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2007
I think most people have read The Catcher in the Rye. XD I love all the symbolism in that book. Actually, that is probably one of the most favorite parts of english class in highschool and early college. They always force you to look beyond the surface of the words - to analyze everything. There is so much more to a book than just chapters and a climax. :)

And I prefer Penguin, anyways. :heart:
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2007
Exactly! I'm a literary student (in my 7th year of it) so I know what you're talking about. That's partly why I love literature, it's a lot of things. I personally think The Catcher in the Rye is under-rated because of its popularity, but I confirm that it's a lot more than it seems, and it's not just a "coming of age" story (I am liable to murder anyone saying this...).

The other books are written in a very different style. Instead of the teenage, spoken style, you get a super wordy style, but that is awesome too. Maybe not for the "Nine Stories", but the rest, yes. They're real jewels of literature, I swear. They have the same spirit as the Catcher, but they're different. And they really show what you can already know with the Catcher, that Salinger is a very profound and loving man. :D
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:iconvirgokitten:
virgokitten Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2007
Eee! You make me want to run out and get them right now, which wouldn't do since I'm rather emerged in several other novels, too! I'm presently reading some books on society, actually. I love snarky, witty authors that have something to say about the world today and culture. That and Chuck Palahniuk, have you read him? He's a gem!

Bravos for being a literary student!!! I'm in college, too - presently off for the semester. I'm going for international relations (I love, love travelling - I want to go back to Europe!!), but I think I'll minor in comparative literature XD
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:iconforgetfulrainn:
ForgetfulRainn Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2007
I saw Fight Club, which is enough to make me interested in Chuck whose name I can never spell. My brother read the book (in a French translation) and said it was good, so I guess it is. Otherwise I never read anything by him, but I know who he is and some of his books.

He's on the list of writers to check, along with Bret Easton Ellis and a couple of others (in that category; my complete list of writers to check is enormous...).

If you want to read a witty French novel, which is at once hilarious and profound, you should check Amélie Nothomb and her novel "Fear & Trembling". I wrote an amazon review which I'll link you to right now... just a sec...

[link]

All my other reviews are there as well, all 84 of them. Enjoy!

I love travelling too; I spent nearly all my money on trips during 2007. I went to Sweden, then to Finland, and in 2005, I went to London, but didn't visit much as I went there for other reasons.
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